Case-Based Nuclear Medicine PDF

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Författare: Kevin J. Donohoe.
Each chapter is packed with high-quality images that demonstrate the full-range of commonly encountered disease manifestations as seen in the practice of nuclear medicine.
The lavishly illustrated cases begin with the clinical presentation and a concise patient history followed by imaging findings, differential diagnoses, the definitive diagnosis and follow-up information, a brief discussion of the background for each diagnosis, and a list of pearls and pitfalls.
Comprehensive coverage of everything from single photon emission computed tomography to PET/CT imaging
Cases presented as unknowns enable readers to develop their own differential diagnoses just like on the exam
Over 400 high-resolution images, including full-color PET/CT and cardiac scintigraphic images, document the cases
Numerous tips, tricks, pearls, and pitfalls highlight key points at the end of each chapter Praise for the first edition:
"Recommend[ed]…for novices and masters alike. It will improve the reader’s breadth of knowledge and ability to make sound clinical decisions."–Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Ideal for self-assessment, the second edition of Case-Based Nuclear Medicine has been fully updated to reflect the latest nuclear imaging technology, including cutting-edge cardiac imaging systems and the latest on PET/CT.
Each chapter is packed with high-quality images that demonstrate the full-range of commonly encountered disease manifestations as seen in the practice of nuclear medicine. The lavishly illustrated cases begin with the clinical presentation and a concise patient history followed by imaging findings, differential diagnoses, the definitive diagnosis and follow-up information, a brief discussion of the background for each diagnosis, and a list of pearls and pitfalls.
Features
– Comprehensive coverage of everything from single photon emission computed tomography to PET/CT imaging
– Cases presented as ‚unknowns‘ enable readers to develop their own differential diagnoses — just like on the exam
– Over 400 high-resolution images, including full-color PET/CT and cardiac scintigraphic images, document the cases
– Numerous tips, tricks, pearls, and pitfalls highlight key points at the end of each chapter
– A scratch-off code provides 12 months of access to RadCases, a searchable online database of 250 must-know nuclear medicine cases
This user-friendly atlas is an essential resource for all residents and fellows in radiology and nuclear medicine as they review for exams and prepare for rounds. Clinicians will find the succinct presentation of cases an invaluable quick reference in daily practice.

Whether applied to medical education, decisions about individuals, guidelines and policies applied to populations, or administration of health services in general, evidence-based medicine advocates that to the greatest extent possible, decisions and policies should be based on evidence, not just the beliefs of practitioners, experts, or administrators. In its broadest form, evidence-based medicine is the application of the scientific method into healthcare decision-making. However, until recently, the process by which research results were incorporated in medical decisions was highly subjective. Beginning in the late 1960s, several flaws became apparent in the traditional approach to medical decision-making. Alvan Feinstein’s publication of Clinical Judgment in 1967 focused attention on the role of clinical reasoning and identified biases that can affect it. The term „evidence-based medicine“, as it is currently used, has two main tributaries.

Chronologically, the first is the insistence on explicit evaluation of evidence of effectiveness when issuing clinical practice guidelines and other population-level policies. The second is the introduction of epidemiological methods into medical education and individual patient-level decision-making. The term „evidence-based“ was first used by David M. Eddy in the course of his work on population-level policies such as clinical practice guidelines and insurance coverage of new technologies. He first began to use the term „evidence-based“ in 1987 in workshops and a manual commissioned by the Council of Medical Specialty Societies to teach formal methods for designing clinical practice guidelines.

The term „evidence-based medicine“ was introduced slightly later, in the context of medical education. This branch of evidence-based medicine has its roots in clinical epidemiology. In 1996, David Sackett and colleagues clarified the definition of this tributary of evidence-based medicine as „the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. This tributary of evidence-based medicine had its foundations in clinical epidemiology, a discipline that teaches health care workers how to apply clinical and epidemiological research studies to their practices. The two original definitions highlight important differences in how evidence-based medicine is applied to populations versus individuals.

Both branches of evidence-based medicine spread rapidly. On the evidence-based guidelines and policies side, explicit insistence on evidence of effectiveness was introduced by the American Cancer Society in 1980. On the medical education side, programs to teach evidence-based medicine have been created in medical schools in Canada, the US, the UK, Australia, and other countries. The term evidence-based medicine is now applied to both the programs that are designing evidence-based guidelines and the programs that teach evidence-based medicine to practitioners.